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1962 Fender Tremolux & Reverb Unit - $3,600 (Brighton)

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Surf’s up!

This is a 1962 Fender Tremolux piggyback amp and cabinet paired with a ’63 Fender Reverb unit – all three pieces in the desirable combination of ‘rough’ blonde tolex, maroon grill cloth and cream knobs.

The amp was recently serviced and is in tip-top, gig-worthy shape; see the last photo for details. The quartet of vintage preamp tubes simply kick ass. Non-original output transformer and a proper three-prong power cord was added.

Of course, this 6G9-A (or B) circuit has that amazing tremolo this era of Fenders is famous for, and it works on both the Normal and Bright channels (which changed in the next generation of Fender amps). It sounds gorgeous – just like Leo intended when it left the Fullerton, Calif. factory 62 years ago.

The 2x10 matching cabinet now sports a pair of Warehouse Guitar Speakers G10C/S 8-ohm speakers for the correct 4-ohm load this head requires. According to WGS:

“The G10C/S, a true WGS original, has become a favorite of players the world over. With its smooth cone and larger motor, it offers a slightly rounder top end and smooth breakup when driven hard while maintaining the punch and clarity you already love in a 10" speaker. It's really great for taming the top end in bright amps with its warm sound and depth in tone. The G10C/S also remains one of the most pedal-friendly tens in our line. So whether you are trying to beef up your vintage combo or build the perfect tone platform, the G10C/S is the place to start.”

After hearing Kenny Vaughan (Marty Stuart) rip through his Fender Deluxe Reverb with the 12” version, I was sold and have used these orange-frame beasts in a number of amps – always with stellar results.

Of course, this piggyback combo screamed for a matching Reverb unit, but an original vintage one is around $3k (if you can find one). I opted for a reissue at half the price but the same great drip and crash. I removed the chrome plaque from the back (because it looks gaudy), but it is included here.

Currently, both the head and the cabinet have reissue dogbone handles. The originals – which are included with the original brackets/screws – can be fragile and break, so I thought it best to set those aside. Neither the head nor the cabinet are heavy, but I wouldn’t risk breaking an original handle.

These closed piggyback cabinets sound different than Fender’s open-back amps. I like to experiment with the back panel off and/or vary the amount of (all original) insulation inside the cab for different sounds. When Fender assembled these back in the day, the speaker wire that attached to the jack on the cabinet’s back panel was very short. I put a longer piece on, but the original is included.

The brown piggyback speaker cable with ‘F’ jack caps, which connects the head to the cabinet, is a spot-on repro, as is the brown single-button footswitch to turn the tremolo on and off (although it isn’t necessary to stop the trem – just turn the Speed and Intensity knobs all the way counterclockwise, if you prefer).

I think that’s about it. It’s a marvelous rig, and prices on these just keep going up. I’m selling all three pieces – head, cabinet, reverb unit – together for $3,600. If you feel my price is out of line, convince me why. I’m a reasonable guy, but I’ve also got 45 years of playing, buying, and selling vintage gear.

As always, cash is king (but PayPal and Venmo rule, too). I’m in Brighton, but I get around the state a bit, too. No trades.

Thanks!

post id: 7735676359

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