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Vintage Hayes Railroad Boxcar Derail Derailer Circa 1905 - $195 (Saline)

Vintage Hayes Railroad Boxcar Derail Derailer Circa 1905 1 thumbnailVintage Hayes Railroad Boxcar Derail Derailer Circa 1905 2 thumbnailVintage Hayes Railroad Boxcar Derail Derailer Circa 1905 3 thumbnailVintage Hayes Railroad Boxcar Derail Derailer Circa 1905 4 thumbnailVintage Hayes Railroad Boxcar Derail Derailer Circa 1905 5 thumbnailVintage Hayes Railroad Boxcar Derail Derailer Circa 1905 6 thumbnail
1560 Judd Rd near Moon

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Vintage Antique Hayes Railroad CAst Iron Boxcar Train Derail Derailer Circa 1905 found abandoned and partially buried at Pittsfield Junction Ann Arbor MI. This Junction intersects the Ann Arbor Railroad with the now defunct railroads Michigan Central, Lakeshore and Michigan Southern Railroads Et Al. A cool piece of Ann Arbor, Saline, Ypsilanti History. The last picture is of an installed more modern derail. The track goes through this from left to right and pushes the train car off the track if it starts to accidentally move onto the main line- which is preferable to a collision.
Western-Cullen-Hayes, Inc. and its predecessor companies have been serving the railroad industry with crossing warning equipment for over 100 years. Item Manufactured in Richmond Indiana and was used to prevent the unauthorized access of rail cars and locomotives, to areas where they could endanger Trains, workers or other equipment such as the mainline track. Derailing a car or locomotive was preferable to a crash with a moving train. Similar more portable derails are still in use today. From Wiki: Derails have failed on occasion, such as on April 1, 1987, at Burnham, Illinois, when an unsecured car in a siding defeated a derail and fouled the mainline. Due to rusty rails, the car then failed to shunt the track circuit that should have put block signals to "stop".[citation needed] On May 15, 2001, CSX 8888 was pulling a train of 47 cars including some loaded with hazardous chemicals, ran uncontrolled for two hours at up to 82 kilometers per hour (51 mph). A portable derail was used but failed, the train simply did not stop. On April 20, 2017, three workers were killed in an accident on the Englewood Railway in Woss, British Columbia when 11 runaway railcars full of logs crashed into them and their equipment while they were working on the line. The railcars had become decoupled at the top of the hill and as they rolled out-of-control down the hill they overpowered the derails which had been installed incorrectly and into rotting rail ties.[10]


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